You, dear Doctor, are my only rescue! / Jest Pan, Panie Doktorze, jedynym ratunkiem! Exeter Performance

Thursday 1 March 2018
Exeter Phoenix, Exeter, Devon

Agnieszka Koscianska and Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay will be staging their bilingual performance installation of LGBT letters to Polish Sexologists in Exeter

Thursday 1 March 2018
16:00–18:00 hrs

Exeter Phoenix
Gandy Street,
Exeter EX4 3LS
Devon

[EN] Letters written to sexologists in socialist Poland – collected by anthropologist and historian Agnieszka Ko?cia?ska – serve as a source material for a performance installation in which an ensemble of performers reviews, transcribes and reads passages aloud in Polish and English.

The performance, created by artist Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay and produced by the Cruising the Seventies Research Group, seeks to reveal the shifting, overlapping positions of queers in Poland struggling to define their identities, build communities and take control of their destinies, painting a portrait of the evolving sexual consciousness of the era.

First performed at Edinburgh’s Basic Mountain, “You, Dear Doctor…!” is now coming to Exeter’s Phoenix. The performance will be followed by a talk by Ko?cia?ska on the roots and purpose of this project and an open discussion with the audience.

Please RSVP at deardoctor.eventbrite.com or on Facebook. More details below. Admission is free of charge. The venue is wheelchair accessible. As of now, we apologize that we are not able to provide BSL interpretation or live transcription for this event.

Event hosted by Rethinking Sexology Project and kindly supported by Exeter University Polish Society.

[PL] Zapraszamy na darmowe wydarzenie po?wi?cone historii seksualno?ci oraz seksuologii w Polsce. Zaczniemy od performance zrodzonego ze wspó?pracy Agnieszki Ko?cia?skiej i Benny’ego Nemerofsky Ramsay’a, po czym us?yszymy nieco wi?cej szczegó?ów na temat ?róde? i celu tego projektu od Agnieszki. Reszt? wieczoru po?wi?cimy dyskusji z publiczno?ci?. Prosimy o potwierdzenie RSVP na stronie deardoctor.eventbrite.com lub bezpo?rednio przez FB. Wi?cej szczegó?ów poni?ej.

Performance wyrasta z listów do seksuologa zebranych przez antropolo?k? i historyczk? seksualno?ci Agnieszk? Ko?cia?sk?. W jego trakcie grupa performerów przepisze odr?cznie i odczyta na g?os ich fragmenty po polsku i po angielsku. Akcja jest prób? pokazania sytuacji seksualnych i p?ciowych odmie?ców w socjalistycznej Polsce i ich walki o zdefiniowanie w?asnych to?samo?ci, zbudowanie wspólnoty i przej?cie kontroli nad swoim losem. Kre?li tym samym portret ewoluuj?cej ?wiadomo?ci seksualnej epoki PRL.

Wystawiony poprzednio w Edynburskim Basic Mountain, “Jest Pan, Panie Doktorze…!” zawita teraz do Exeter Phoenix.

Wst?p wolny. Budynek Exeter Phoenix jest dostosowany do potrzeb osób korzystaj?cych z wózka inwalidzkiego. Niestety obecnie nie jeste?my w stanie zaoferowa? t?umaczenia w formie BSL lub transkrypcji na ?ywo, za co przepraszamy.

Wydarzenie powstaje we wspó?pracy z Rethinking Sexology Project i ze wsparciem Exeter University Polish Society.

The Five Ages – A floral archaeology of queer Berlin

Monday 19 February 2018
Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh
12:30-13:30

Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay’s Five Ages performs a floral archaeology that explores the relationships between human history and plant life, specifically within the context of a queer aesthetics.

Mon 19 February 2018
12:30 – 13:30

Seminar Room 5
Chrystal Macmillan Building
15a George Square
Edinburgh
EH8 9LD

University of Edinburgh Staff Pride Network are proud to present “The Five Ages” as part of our Queer Research Showcase for LGBT History Month.

The Five Ages performs a floral archaeology that explores the relationships between human history and plant life, specifically within the context of a queer aesthetics. Nemerofsky selects five flowers to symbolize distinct moments in the history of El Dorado, referencing both its incarnation as interwar Berlin nightclub and early 80s art exhibition, as well as its general application as a legendary, faraway site of utopian longing. The flowers stand in a ceramic vase designed by the artist to provide each flower with its own distinct opening. The artist arranges the flowers to interact contrapuntally, creating a bouquet of colliding and overlapping temporalities. The Five Ages was created for the 2017 Odarodle exhibition at Berlin’s Schwules Museum.

Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay is a Montreal-born artist, diarist and correspondent. His artistic work mediates emotional encounters with musical, art historical and Queer cultural material, encouraging deep listening and empathic viewing. In his work you will find bells, bouquets, ceramic vases, enchanted forests, folding screens, gay elders, glitter, gold leaf, love letters, imaginary paintings, madrigals, megaphones, mirrors, naked men, sex-changing flowers, sign language, subtitles, and the voices of birds, boy sopranos, contraltos, countertenors, and sirens. Nemerofsky’s work has been exhibited internationally, and is part of the permanent collections of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna, the Polin Museum for the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, Thielska Galleriet Stockholm and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa. He is a Ph.D. candidate at the Edinburgh College of Art and a member of the Cruising the 70s: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures research team. www.nemerofsky.ca
The venue is wheelchair accessible.

Oral history and herstory / Oral history w sluzbie herstory. Miejsce kobiecych relacji i wywiadów w procesie tworzenia feministycznej wizji przeszlosci w Polsce

Report from CRUSEV Poland’s seminar on the role of women’s stories and interviews in the process of creating feminist narratives of the past in Poland, with Dr Dobrochna Kalwa, held at the University of Warsaw.

The third public seminar organized by the Polish CRUSEV team was held at the University of Warsaw on Friday, November 24 2017. Our guest was Dr Dobrochna Kalwa, a historian from the Institute of History at the University of Warsaw. Dr Kalwa gave a lecture about the history of development of women-oriented oral history research in Poland. She discussed a number of important feminist history projects conducted in recent years by Polish historians, providing a critical framework that was needed for the later introduction of the concept of “oral herstories.” The lecture also covered several issues concerning the methodological and ethical problems facing “oral historians” in their studies of women’s biographies, including the problematic nature of a “witness of history,” differences between memory and history, or the many rhetoric strategies that can be adopted by the interviewees. Further points about the application of this methodology to study “hidden” LGBTQ narratives were raised during the discussion, as well as the need to continue oral herstory research among non-normative witnesses of the recent past.

“Resistencias del Sur. Usos del Pasado, Periferias y Espacios de liberación sexual”/ “Resistance from the Queer South: Uses of the Past, Peripheries, and the Spaces of Sexual Liberation”

Friday 28 – Saturday 29 April 2018
Institut Valencià d’Art Modern, Valencià
Solicitud de Comunicaciones/Call for Papers

The Spanish 1970s have been subject to considerable revisionary research in the last few years, in part because of the numerous characteristics that decade shares with our own. The purpose of this conference is not to return upon well-trodden ground, but to cast some light upon those aspects of the period that have been neglected by existing accounts, and to rethink the culture and politics of sexual dissidence in 1970s Spain in relation to three frames of reference: (s)exiles, parties and other forms of resistance, and queer counter-memories / militant anarchives.

SOLICITUD DE COMUNICACIONES
Congreso Internacional
“Resistencias del Sur.
Usos del Pasado, Periferias y Espacios de liberación sexual”

27 y 28 de abril de 2018
Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM)
C/ Guillen de Castro 118
46003 Valencia

 //  CALL FOR PAPERS
International Conference:
“Resistance from the Queer South:
Uses of the Past, Peripheries, and the Spaces of Sexual Liberation”

April 27 and 28, 2018
Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM)
C/ Guillen de Castro 118
46003 Valencia

[English Version below]

La década de los setenta ha sido motivo de numerosas revisiones durante los últimos años en España, en gran parte por los numerosos elementos comunes que tiene con el presente ?crisis económica, agotamiento de régimen, experimentación política y social, movilizaciones ciudadanas masivas? que en la actualidad nos hacen mirar hacia el pasado buscando explicaciones, pero también inspiración. En materia de disidencias sexuales los 70 fueron un gran espacio de experimentación, lucha y resistencia. La década comenzó con el recrudecimiento de la represión mediante la aprobación de la Ley de Peligrosidad y Rehabilitación Social (1970); la consiguiente reacción a esta ley fue la fundación en 1971 del Movimiento Español de Liberación Homosexual (MELH), el primer colectivo militante en defensa de las trans, lesbianas y gais del Estado español. Este colectivo se desarrolló en la clandestinidad, igual que eran clandestinas por entonces las vidas de quienes no encajaban en la norma heteropatriarcal. La historia del movimiento y de las bases sociales que lo atravesaron entre aquel momento inaugural y los cambios culturales y políticos que llegaron con la crisis del SIDA en los 80 al Estado español ha sido narrada ampliamente en los últimos tiempos, como parte de la revisión histórica del periodo transicional general de las periferias europeas. No queremos aquí volver a insistir sobre experiencias ya conocidas, sino arrojar luz sobre las zonas más oscuras un tanto olvidadas por los relatos existentes. Para ello acotaremos tres marcos de referencia con el fin de pensar la cultura y la política de la disidencia sexual de los setenta: los sexilios, la fiesta y otras variedades de resistencia, memoria y contrametodologías queer de los archivos precarios y militantes.

Sexilios: Dadas las condiciones de asfixiante dictadura en España, desde bien temprano el movimiento de liberación sexual representado por el MELH pudo sobrevivir únicamente gracias a los contactos de sus fundadorxs con otros grupos extranjeros, fundamentalmente franceses, británicos y estadounidenses. Con la muerte de Franco en 1975 los colectivos de gais, lesbianas y trans se multiplicaron por todo el país e igualmente sus conexiones e intercambios con otras geografías. A España llegaron referencias culturales y políticas de distintas latitudes de America Latina y del sur de Europa. Se estrecharon lazos, se tradujeron libros y llegaron lxs exiliadxs sexuales que enriquecieron los discursos del activismo y transitaron las nuevas redes de socialización tejidas entre las bases sociales de la transición. La resistencia sexual en España nacía atravesada por la idea del sexilio, como una amalgama de acentos y con una vocación solidaria e internacionalista que extendió los planteamientos sobre sexualidad y género hasta mezclarlos con los de diáspora y más adelante también con ideas sobre la raza y el mestizaje. Sin embargo, estos flujos culturales y políticos sólo se conocen a grandes rasgos, nombres como Mario Mieli, Copi o Héctor Anabitarte resuenan en un imaginario colectivo que aún está por explorar.

Fiesta y otras resistencias: La cultura de la liberación sexual atravesó los espacios marginales de la realidad española. Durante los 70, la actividad militante contra las leyes represivas y el desarrollo más o menos sumergido de nuevas formas de vida centradas en la liberación de los deseos y en la expresión desacomplejada de las sexualidades encontraron en el carácter resistente una de sus principales constantes. La creación fue terreno constante de experimentación con estrategias de resistencia, y las redes de afecto que se tejieron entre marginadxs hicieron más llevadera la opresión y facilitaron la supervivencia.  El espacio común de la fiesta, que siempre había sido lugar de encuentro y complicidad entre subalternxs, se convirtió en reducto habitual de resistencia, hasta el punto de que las manifestaciones políticas fueron por momentos carnaval y los locales nocturnos y los lugares de encuentro y de ligue gay más o menos clandestinos, como parques, cines y otros entornos públicos o semi-públicos se convirtieron en espacios de conspiración en nombre de la disidencia política y sexual. La resistencia atravesaba todas las dimensiones de la vida alrededor del movimiento de liberación, pero no se conocen aún sus múltiples rostros, especialmente en las periferias peninsulares. Si bien los espacios de la fiesta y la resistencia de Madrid y Barcelona han sido documentados en testimonios personales y estudios históricos, los de otras zonas de la península permanecen aún sin explorar. Y esto es aún más evidente en el caso de las comunidades lésbica y trans, a menudo soslayadas en historias de la liberación sexual centradas en sus protagonistas masculinos.

Contrametodologías queer: El estudio del pasado, aun cuando sea relativamente reciente, plantea problemas metodológicos. Primero por el inevitable declive de sus testigos, que hace de la recuperación de la memoria vulnerable una tarea urgente y de resistencia: lxs protagonistas de los 70 conservan vivencias, recuerdos y materiales en forma de colecciones personales, que en ocasiones se encuentran en una deriva precaria que hace indispensable un trabajo de archivo militante. En segundo término porque las inercias historiográficas dominantes tienden a colonizar el pasado desde el presente y a homogeneizarlo a través de narrativas que pierden de vista su especificidad. A menudo la memoria hegemónica funciona como un ritual de poder con ánimo caníbal que, a través de las lógicas de jerarquización y catalogación, puede hacer desaparecer con facilidad  la variedad de las diversidades sexuales de los 70. La precariedad y la inercia de la historia hacen necesaria una reactivación del pasado que respete su diferencia específica con respecto al presente y que busque reactivar estilos de disidencia y formas de análisis de la opresión sexual que puedan ser movilizados para la construcción del presente y el futuro. Esto ha de llevarnos a mantener un debate sobre la memoria activa del pasado como activadora del presente entre metodologías contrahegemónicas, archivos visuales y pedagogías queer críticas.

El congreso “Resistencias del sur” pretende constituirse al mismo tiempo como un espacio para la investigación y la reflexión histórica y para la experimentación metodológica en su propio funcionamiento interno. Desde la organización del congreso se plantean tres ejes temáticos Sexilios, Fiestas y otras resistencias y Contrametodologías queer/Archivos precarios/archivos militantes, para trabajar con ellos y pensar las realidades culturales, sociales y políticas de trans, lesbianas y gais en la España de los años 70, con el propósito de problematizar algunos lugares comunes respecto a su historia e indagar en los puntos ciegos que nos dejan los relatos de que actualmente disponemos.

Las propuestas deben incluir un título, cinco palabras clave, el nombre y una breve biografía de de lxs autorxs, el eje de trabajo al cual van dirigidos (de los tres indicados arriba) y un resumen que tendrá una extensión máxima de 500 palabras. El plazo de recepción de propuestas será el 8 de enero de 2018. La selección de ponencias se comunicará a partir del 22 de enero. Lxs ponentes seleccionados deberán entregar posteriormente los textos de sus comunicaciones. La extensión de estos textos será de 2500 palabras como máximo y la fecha límite de entrega el 6 de abril.  Las comunicaciones aceptadas se colgarán en la página del congreso a partir del 10 de abril hasta la celebración del mismo y su lectura será obligada para lxs participantes de cada una de las mesas, de modo que durante el congreso las personas que compongan cada mesa expondrán brevemente los principales puntos de su propuesta, a fin de asegurar que el público asistente conozca su contenido, y a continuación se iniciará un debate/conversación sobre los distintos temas planteados entre todxs lxs compañerxs de las mesas, que estará abierto también a la participación de lxs asistentes.

Todas las comunicaciones han de enviarse a la dirección alberto.berzosa@um.es antes del 8 de enero de 2018.

Consultas: alberto.berzosa@um.es

El congreso tendrá lugar los días 27 y 28 de abril de 2018 en las instalaciones del Intitut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM) en Valencia.

Comité organizador-comité científico: Alejandro Melero Salvador, Alberto Mira, Alberto Berzosa, Francisco Godoy, Gracia Trujillo, Jesús Carrillo, Juan Antonio Suárez, Juan Vicente Aliaga, Lucas R. Platero, María Rosón, Noemi de Haro García, Virginia Villaplana Ruiz.

El congreso está organizado como parte del proyecto “Cruising the 1970s: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures”, financiado por el Programa de Investigación e Innovación Horizon 2020, en su modalidad Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA), acuerdo número 649307, y ha sido coordinado desde la Universidad de Murcia en colaboración con el Intitut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM), de Valencia.

Universidades asociadas en CRUSEV: University of Edinburgh (Project Leader), Humboldt Universität, Universidad de Varsovia, Universidad de Murcia, University of Newcastle, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Universidad de Valencia, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Oxford-Brookes University.

*

The Spanish 1970s have been subject to considerable revisionary research in the last few years, in part because of the numerous characteristics that decade shares with our own—both are marked by economic crisis, by the exhaustion of a dominant state model, by social and political experimentation, and by mass mobilizations. These common traits make us look back in search of explanations for our current ills, but also in search of inspiration for moving forward. From the perspective of sexual history, the 1970s in Spain were years of experimentation, struggle, and resistance; of losses and gains. The decade started with the passing of the Bill of Public Danger and Rehabilitation (Ley de peligrosidad y rehabilitación social 1970). It was promptly countered by the foundation in 1971 of the Spanish Movement for Homosexual Liberation (MELH), the pioneering Spanish sexual liberation collective, whose activities had to remain clandestine. The history of sexual liberation in Spain between that inaugural moment and the cultural and political changes that came about as a result of the AIDS epidemic has been often, if partially, told. The purpose of this conference is not to return upon well-trodden ground, but to cast some light upon those aspects of the period that have been neglected by existing accounts, and to rethink the culture and politics of sexual dissidence in 1970s Spain in relation to three frames of reference: (s)exiles, parties and other forms of resistance, and queer counter-memories / militant anarchives.

(S)exiles: In the suffocating conditions of Franco’s dictatorship, the Spanish Movement for Homosexual Liberation survived largely thanks to contacts with foreign groups—especially French, British, and North American. After Franco’s death in 1975, the number of activist cells increased significantly and exchange and collaboration with non-Spanish liberation fronts grew; these contacts resulted in the translation and edition of foreign theoretical texts and manifestoes, whose ideas influenced local activists. At the same time, Spain became a destination for Latin American sexual exiles, who enriched the discourses of activism and became integrated into Spanish networks of queer sociability. Sexual resistance in 1970s Spain was fundamentally shaped by (s)exile and, as such, it was multi-accented, solidary, internationalist, diasporic, and multi-ethnic. However, we still have a fairly incomplete knowledge of these transnational cultural and political flows and of their protagonists; the lives and work of sexual and political exiles such as Cristina Peri Rossi, Mario Mieli, Copi, or Héctor Anabitarte are well known by now, but could be further studied. Many others remain to be discovered, and the full range and dynamism of expatriate networks, and their intersections with local militant cultures, remains to be articulated.

Partying and other forms of resistance: Sexual liberation and anti-authoritarian resistance were confined to marginal locations and clandestine affect networks in 1970s Spain. Main enclaves of sexual resistance at the time were: a furtive private party scene, cruising grounds, cinemas, and scattered clubs and bars where homosexuality was tolerated. These were settings for sexual reinvention and expressiveness, and politically charged sites where normative strictures were temporarily suspended and incipient queer communities made themselves visible. While the spaces of resistance and queer sociability in the largest cities—Madrid and Barcelona—have been relatively well accounted for, those in other areas of the country are yet to be documented and studied, especially those created by lesbian, trans, and immigrant communities.

Queer counter-memory / queer anarchives: The study of the sexual past is laden with methodological problems. The inevitable decline of direct witnesses and protagonists makes the recovery of personal memories an urgent task. In the case of 1970s sexual activists, personal memory has become materialized in collections that are often in a precarious state and whose preservation and cataloguing is crucial. In addition, dominant historiographic inertias tend to colonize and homogenize the past, imposing upon it perspectives that are not its own; as a result, its specificity and sexual diversity may become obliterated or distorted. These two dangers—the precariousness of historical traces and the colonization of the past by current interests and investments—force us to confront the past through a mixture of counter-memory and critical pedagogy; the goal is its reactivation and the retrieval of forms of dissidence and analytical tools of use in the articulation of a critical present and an emancipated future. This section invites methodological reflections upon these issues that rise from first-hand experiences of examining, retrieving, or organizing and cataloguing sexual archives.

The conference “Resistance from the Queer South” wants to be both an occasion for historical reflection and research and a space for methodological experimentation. While we are focused on the production of “hard” knowledge about the queer 1970s in Spain, we welcome—encourage, in fact!—alternative research methodologies and styles of presentation.

Proposals must include: title, five keywords, name of the author(s), and indication of the thematic axis to which it contributes–(s)exiles; partying and other forms of resistance; queer counter-memory / queer anarchive)—and a summary of 500 words. The deadline for proposals is January 8, 2018. They must be mailed to: alberto.berzosa@um.es

Notice of acceptance will be mailed by January 22, 2018. In case of acceptance, full presentations (2500 words) ought to be mailed to conference organizers by April 6, 2018; they will be made available to participants and attendees through the conference web site after April 10, previous to the celebration of the conference. In this way, presenters will be liberated from the usual routine of reading their papers and may try a more informal, dynamic style of presentation, hopefully conducive to audience involvement and active exchange.

Conference site: Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM): C/ Guillen de Castro 118, 46003 Valencia.

Contact address: Please send your queries to alberto.berzosa@um.es

Scientific and Organising Committee: Alejandro Melero Salvador, Alberto Mira, Alberto Berzosa, Francisco Godoy, Gracia Trujillo, Jesús Carrillo, Juan Antonio Suárez, Juan Vicente Aliaga, Lucas R. Platero, María Rosón, Noemi de Haro García, Virginia Villaplana Ruiz.

The Conference is part of the activities of the Collaborative Research Project CRUSEV-“Cruising the 1970s: Unearthing Pre-HIV / AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures”, leadered by Glyn Davis (University of Edinburgh) and funded by the Research and Innovation Program Horizon 2020-Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA), Grant no. 649307. The Conference is coordinated by the University of Murcia in collaboration with the Intitut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM), de Valencia.

CRUSEV partner universities: University of Edinburgh (Project Leader), Humboldt Universität, Universidad de Varsovia, Universidad de Murcia, University of Newcastle, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Universidad de Valencia, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Oxford-Brookes University

Documentation: Millones de perversas. La radicalidad sexual en los años setenta/Millions of perverts. Sexual radicality in the seventies

Video Documentation of CRUSEV Spain’s seminar on LGBTQ radical sexual politics and cultures from the 1970s, held in Madrid, June 2017

Con el seminario Millones de perversas tratamos de invocar la memoria de esos sujetos y movimientos impugnando una narrativa hegemónica centrada en la supuesta conquista progresiva de derechos LGTBIQ. Las distintas sesiones de este seminario se plantean reactivar aquellas disruptivas políticas y poéticas. POÉTICAS presta atención a lo que sucedía en lugares concretos – como la efervescente Barcelona postfranquista o los espacios expresivos lésbicos de los años setenta – en un intento de dar claves para entender las poéticas desplegadas desde el ámbito de las culturas sexuales radicales de aquella década. REDES Y AFECTOS. ¿Qué redes de afecto tramaban la vida de trans, maricas y lesbianas en la España de los setenta? Esta sesión se plantea el modo de reelaborarlas desde el presente a través de relaciones intergeneracionales, procesos performativos e investigaciones situadas que problematizan las nociones convencionales de memoria y archivo. MILITANCIAS trata sobre la pervivencia – muchas veces inconsciente – en las luchas sexo-disidentes actuales de las políticas de los años setenta. Esto se aborda en forma de diálogo entre activistas, especialistas y militantes historicxs y en activo. En resumen, Millones de perversas pretende conseguir que sean de nuevo transitables fórmulas colectivas de lucha, explora genealogías de ciertos planteamientos transgresores sobre la sexualidad y el género, y activa en nuestro presente los usos políticos de las memorias de la radicalidad sexual que el tiempo y sus narraciones oficiales han difuminado.

26/6/2017

Presentación. Visita a exposiciones “Anarchivo Sida” y “¿Archivo Queer?”. Performance “Tensiones en un ángulo de 90º” de Laura Corcuera.


Mesa redonda con la participación de Silvia Reyes, Rampova y Luis Escribano. Moderan Juan Vicente Aliaga y Juan Antonio Suárez.


Mesa redonda con Elena Castro, Meri Torras y Txus García. Moderan Alberto Mira y Lucas Platero.

27/6/2017

Tres activaciones: Un secreto de tu abuela se enrarece entre tus mejillas, de Ana Pol y Mónica Almagro; Memorias escondidas, del colectivo Rodando pichi; El archivo de Emilio: “Deja de sufrir, estúpido”, de Marta Echaves, Alejandro Simón y Jesús Bravo.


Mesa redonda con Rosa Medina Doménech, María José Belbel y Dolors Ribalta. Modera Noemí de Haro.


Mesa redonda con Kerman Calvo, Maite Irazábal, Ramón Linaza y Carmen Monzonís. Modera Alberto Berzosa.


Performance “40 años SON” del colectivo O.R.G.I.A


Mesa redonda con Javi Larrauri, Leticia Rojas, Mónica Redondo y Pablo Andrade. Moderada por Gracia Trujillo.

Families of choice: old age, care, relations. Reflexions on focus group/ Rodziny z wyboru: starosc, opieka i relacje. Refleksje z wywiadow grupowych

A brief report from CRUSEV Poland’s seminar featuring Joanna Mizielinska, Justyna Struzik and Agnieszka Krol from the “Families of Choice in Poland” research project

The second public seminar organized by the Polish CRUSEV team was held at the University of Warsaw on Wednesday, October 25. Our guests were Dr Joanna Mizielinska, Dr Justyna Struzik and Agnieszka Krol, researchers from the “Families of Choice in Poland” research project (2013-2016). They began with presenting a general overview of their sociological study which was centered around the contemporary reality of non-normative families living in Polish cities, before moving to address the specific issue of senior LGBT+ members and their outlook on queer life today and in the past. Some of the points that were raised during the seminar included the different approaches to (and evaluations of) coming-out as they were discussed by respondents aged 55+; the gendered differences in constructing autobiographical narratives; and the various strategies adopted by respondents in order to position themselves within both the wider LGBT+ community, as well as the entire Polish society. The meeting was attended by academics and students from the University of Warsaw and the University of Social Sciences and Humanities, as well as some participants of the research.

Inventing History: Polish Literature, Queers, and Mapping the Past/Wymyslanie historii. Literatura polska, queer i mapa przeszlosci

Report from CRUSEV Poland’s first public seminar, including remarks from Dr Blazej Warkocki

The first public seminar held by the Polish CRUSEV team was held at the University of Warsaw on Wednesday, September 27. Dr Blazej Warkocki, CRUSEV Researcher, offered remarks on preoccupation with the queer past in recent Polish literature. He argued that the tendency to investigate and narrate the past is evident in comparison with an earlier emphasis on representations of queer positionality here and now. In his lecture, Warkocki described the 1970s as a pre-political period, prior to all forms of organized queer activism. He gave examples of relatively unknown queer writers from the 1970s and the early 1980s, such as Grzegorz Musiol and Malgorzata Lavergne, and he discussed some popular films and novels that feature cross-dressing or include overt reference to queers. A lively discussion ensued, focusing especially on the real-socialist decades, including the Seventies. The meeting was attended by academics and students from the University of Warsaw, the University of Social Sciences and Humanities, and the Polish Academy of Sciences.

You, dear Doctor, are my only rescue! / Jest Pan, Panie Doktorze, jedynym ratunkiem!

Tuesday 8 August 2017
Basic Mountain, Edinburgh

A performance installation by Agnieszka Koscianska and Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay. In socialist Poland, sexologists who ran columns in youth magazines received thousands of letters…

A performance installation by Agnieszka Koscianska and Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay

Tuesday 8th August 2017
17:30 – 19:00

Basic Mountain
1 Hill St, Edinburgh EH2 3JP

In socialist Poland, sexologists who ran columns in youth magazines received thousands of letters: “I’m a lesbian”; “Homosexuality is the most horrible sexual perversion. I experienced it personally, and consider this my life’s tragedy…”; “I’m 20 years old and I’m afraid of the future because my body is developing as a woman, while my soul is developing as a man”. Readers asked for help: “I’m in trouble and I don’t know how to get out of it”; shared: “People who love differently can be happy!”; or called for action: “Ladies, if you feel that destiny has hurt you by making you love women, write!”. Sexologists not only printed these letters, but also empathized with the authors, and modified their scientific views in order to answer concerns of their queer readers. As a result, these patient-oriented sex columns were the space of dialogue, and up to the mid-1980s, the only mainstream forum where queer voices could be heard.

A selection of these letters, collected by visiting anthropologist and historian of sexuality Agnieszka Koscianska, serve as source material for a performance installation in which an ensemble of performers reviews, transcribes and reads aloud passages in Polish and English. The performance seeks to reveal the shifting, overlapping positions of queers in Poland struggling to define their identities, build communities and take control of their destinies, painting a portrait of the evolving sexual consciousness of the era.

W PRL seksuolodzy piszacy do prasy mlodziezowej dostawali tysiace listow: „Jestem lesbijka”; „Najpotworniejszym ze zboczen seksualnych jest homoseksualizm. Doswiadczam tego na wlasnej skorze, co uwazam za swoja zyciowa tragedie”. „Mam 20 lat i obawiam si? przyszlosci, poniewaz cialo moje rozwija sie w kierunku kobiecym, a dusza w meskim”. Czytelnicy prosili o pomoc: „Jestem w klopocie i nie wiem, jak z tego wybrnac”; zwierzali sie: „Ludzie kochajacy inaczej moga byc szczesliwi!”; wzywali innych do dzialania: „Dziewczyny, jezeli czujecie sie skrzywdzone przez los miloscia do kobiet, napiszcie!”. Seksuolodzy nie tylko publikowali te listy, lecz takze wczuwali sie w problemy autorow i rewidowali swoje poglady, by pomoc queerowym czytelnikom. W rezultacie te zorientowane na potrzeby pacjentow rubryki staly sie przestrzenia dialogu i do polowy lat 80. XX wieku jedynym miejscem w kulturze glownego nurtu, gdzie mozna bylo uslyszec glosy odmiencow.

Performance wyrasta z listow do seksuologa zebranych przez antropolozke i historyczke seksualnosci Agnieszke Koscianska. W jego trakcie grupa performerow przepisze odrecznie i odczyta na glos ich fragmenty po polsku i po angielsku. Akcja jest proba pokazania sytuacji seksualnych i plciowych odmiencow w socjalistycznej Polsce i ich walki o zdefiniowanie wlasnych tozsamosci, zbudowanie wspolnoty i przejecie kontroli nad swoim losem. Kresli tym samym portret ewoluujacej swiadomosci seksualnej epoki PRL.

Tickets for the event are free and can be booked via EventBrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/you-dear-doctor-are-my-only-rescue-tickets-36510565083

Project Concept:
Agnieszka Koscianska
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay

Performance:
Colin Herd
Agnieszka Koscianska
Damian Matwiejuk
Michal Petryk
Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay
Nat Raha
Ewelina Rydzewska

Production:
Cruising the Seventies: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS Queer Sexual Cultures
Polish-English Translation:
Marta Rozmyslowicz

Agnieszka Koscianska’s research in Edinburgh is funded by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Caledonian Research Fund.

Accessibility: Please note that the performance space at Basic Mountain has no wheelchair access. The performance space is up two flights of stairs and the venue does not have a lift. We are unable to provide BSL interpretation or live transcription for this event.

 

Cruising the Past

Sunday 13 August 2017
LUX, London

This day workshop explores cruising as a method for tracing the queer past and surviving in the present and future, drawing on Fiona Anderson and Laura Guy’s research into pre-HIV/AIDS queer social and sexual cultures, regeneration, and community building in the 1970s.

One Day Workshop
Sunday 13 August 2017
11:00 – 17:00 BST

LUX
Dartmouth Park Hill
London N19 5JF
UK

This day workshop explores cruising as a method for tracing the queer past and surviving in the present and future, drawing on Fiona Anderson and Laura Guy’s research into pre-HIV/AIDS queer social and sexual cultures, regeneration, and community building in the 1970s. Participants will be invited, collectively, to explore ways that queer archival material and artists’ moving image work might be cruised in turn in order to uncover forgotten histories and foreground queer communities in danger of being lost or obscured in the present. Through group discussion and film screenings, we will devise methods of sharing this material with each other through writing, performance, and site-specific activities.

This event is part of LUX’s summer long programme CRUISING GROUND. CRUISING GROUND brings together a range of perspectives and discourses on cruising. The programme engages with the 50th anniversary of the Sexual Offences Act 1967, which decriminalised private homosexual acts between two men over the age of twenty-one. A programme of screenings, workshops and events has been developed in collaboration with CRUSEV.

Please register for the workshop via EventBrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/cruising-the-past-tickets-36480406879

Accessibility information will be posted here shortly.

Seminario Millones de perversas. La radicalidad sexual en los años setenta/Millions of perverts. Sexual radicality in the seventies

26-27 June 2017
CentroCentro y Conde Duque, Madrid

Millions of perverses aims to make collective formulas of struggle again accessible, explores genealogies of certain transgressive approaches to sexuality and gender, and activates in our present the political uses of the memories of sexual radicality that time and his official narrations have blurred.

Lugar: CentroCentro y Conde Duque
Fechas: 26 y 27 de junio de 2017

El 26 de junio de 1977 las travestis, trans, bolleras y maricas organizadas salieron a la calle en Barcelona para pedir la derogación de la Ley de Peligrosidad y Rehabilitación Social. Reclamaban con su voz y sus cuerpos la libertad sexual secuestrada bajo el franquismo. Rambla abajo, ocuparon el espacio público con identidades y formas de vida que hasta ese momento solo habían podido expresarse en espacios marginales o privados. La manifestación (no autorizada) duró hasta que aparecieron los grises.

Podemos considerar esta manifestación un momento de condensación de los movimientos de liberación homosexual que venían articulándose desde hacía tiempo. Visibilizar hoy la discontinuidad entre las subjetividades de aquellas perversas y el marco en que se fue fraguando el pacto político y social durante la transición a la democracia nos permite, cuarenta años después, actualizar el potencial crítico de sus discursos y prácticas corporales y vitales.

Con el seminario Millones de perversas tratamos de invocar la memoria de esos sujetos y movimientos impugnando una narrativa hegemónica centrada en la supuesta conquista progresiva de derechos LGTBIQ. Las distintas sesiones de este seminario se plantean reactivar aquellas disruptivas políticas y poéticas.

POÉTICAS presta atención a lo que sucedía en lugares concretos – como la efervescente Barcelona postfranquista o los espacios expresivos lésbicos de los años setenta – en un intento de dar claves para entender las poéticas desplegadas desde el ámbito de las culturas sexuales radicales de aquella década.

REDES Y AFECTOS. ¿Qué redes de afecto tramaban la vida de trans, maricas y lesbianas en la España de los setenta? Esta sesión se plantea el modo de reelaborarlas desde el presente a través de relaciones intergeneracionales, procesos performativos e investigaciones situadas que problematizan las nociones convencionales de memoria y archivo.

MILITANCIAS trata sobre la pervivencia – muchas veces inconsciente – en las luchas sexo-disidentes actuales de las políticas de los años setenta. Esto se aborda en forma de diálogo entre activistas, especialistas y militantes historicxs y en activo.

En resumen, Millones de perversas pretende conseguir que sean de nuevo transitables fórmulas colectivas de lucha, explora genealogías de ciertos planteamientos transgresores sobre la sexualidad y el género, y activa en nuestro presente los usos políticos de las memorias de la radicalidad sexual que el tiempo y sus narraciones oficiales han difuminado.

Entrada libre hasta completar aforo

PROGRAMA. CentroCentro y Conde Duque

Lunes 26 de junio

PRESENTACIÓN. Conde Duque

12:00 h. Presentación

12:15 h. Visitas a las exposiciones Anarchivo sida y Archivo Queer

13:00 h. Laura Corcuera. Tensiones en un ángulo de 90º (performance)

POÉTICAS. CentroCentro. Auditorio Caja de Música

17:00 h. Barcelona y otras escenas. Mesa redonda con la participación de Luis Escribano, Rampova y Silvia Reyes

19:00 h. Poéticas lésbicas. Mesa redonda con la participación de Meri Torras, Elena Castro y Txus García

Martes 27 de junio

REDES DE AFECTOS. CentroCentro. Sala Sigfrido Martín Begué

10:00 h. Tres activaciones: Un secreto de tu abuela se enrarece entre tus mejillas, de Ana Pol y Mónica Almagro; Memorias escondidas, del colectivo Rodando pichi; El archivo de Emilio: “Deja de sufrir, estúpido”, de Marta Echaves, Alejandro Simón y Jesús Bravo

12:15 h. Descanso

12:45 h. Reflexiones en torno a los afectos lésbicos. Años 70, un debate abierto. Mesa redonda con Rosa Medina Doménech, María José Belbel y Dolors Ribalta.

MILITANCIAS. CentroCentro. Auditorio Caja de Música

17:00 h. Proyección de los cortos Abajo la ley de peligrosidad social (José R. Ahumada, 1977) y Manifestación per lAlliberament Sexual en el Pais Valencia (Miquel Alamar i Berenguer / Pedro Ortuño, 1979-2015). Presentación a cargo de José R. Ahumada.

17:30 h. Los activismos de los años 70. Mesa redonda con Kerman Calvo, Maite Irazábal, Ramón Linaza y Carmen Monzonís

19:00 h. 40 años SON, de O.R.G.I.A (performance)

19:30 h. Proyección de fragmentos de Testigos de un tiempo maldito (Javi Larrauri, 2012) y mesa redonda Los activismos hoy, con Javi Larrauri, Leticia Rojas, Mónica Redondo y Pablo Andrade

Más información

El seminario Millones de perversas forma parte de las actividades del Proyecto de Investigación Europeo Cruising the 1970s-CRUSEV (integrado por Alejandro Melero, Alberto Mira, Alberto Berzosa, Francisco Godoy, Gracia Trujillo, Jesús Carrillo, Josep-Anton Fernàndez, Juan Antonio Suárez, Juan Vicente Aliaga, Lucas Platero, María Rosón, Noemí de Haro García, Virginia Villaplana Ruiz)

Our Desire is a Revolution: Images of sexual diversity in the Spanish State (1977-2017) – Exhibition, Madrid

An exhibition, curated by Juan Guardiola and Juan Suárez, of the LGBTQ audiovisual culture in Spain since the first demonstration in defence of the rights of gays and lesbians in September 1977 in Barcelona.

CENTROCENTRO CIBELES DE CULTURA Y CIUDADANÍA
Plaza de Cibeles, 1
28014 Madrid

23 Junio – 01 Octubre 2017/21st June – 1st October 2017

*

[Spanish, English translation follows]

Una revisión de la cultura audiovisual LGBTQ en España desde la primera manifestación en defensa de los derechos de gays y lesbianas en septiembre de 1977 en Barcelona, hito que marca el inicio de la militancia sexual en nuestro país, hasta el presente.

Nuestro deseo es una revolución muestra cómo diversas prácticas artísticas y discursivas gays, lésbicas y queer han combinado los lenguajes de las vanguardias artísticas y la iconografía y modos de hacer de las subculturas de la calle para politizar la representación del cuerpo y la sexualidad, para cuestionar el funcionamiento de las esferas pública y privada y para releer la historia hegemónica que invisibiliza a los sujetos marginales.

La vocación experimental y abiertamente política de la imagen queer ha quedado relativamente relegada en décadas recientes, tras los años álgidos de la crisis del SIDA, debido a la asimilación de la sexualidad gay-lésbica-queer a un nicho de mercado y al auge de reivindicaciones más orientadas a la gestión del ámbito privado (derecho al matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo) que a la transformación colectiva de la sociedad, como pretendía gran parte del activismo de los años setenta y del movimiento queer posterior.

Frente a estas estrategias de normalización, esta exposición recuerda la tradición de experimentación formal ligada a la disidencia sexual en el arte, una experimentación motivada por la conciencia de que para dar cuenta de una revolución sexual y social sin precedentes, aún en marcha, había que reinventar los modos de crear y narrar, de articular imágenes y de utilizar los medios artísticos.

Artistas y colectivos presentes en la muestra:

Carlos Aires, Florencia Aliberti, Pedro Almodóvar y Fabio McNamara, Alexander Apóstol, Manu Arregui, Cecilia Barriga, Biel Capllonch, Tino Casal, Gabriel Casas, Eduardo Chicharro, Javier Codesal, Joan Colom, Fito Conesa, Xavier-Daniel, Diego del Pozo, Luis María Delgado, David Domingo, Lucía Egaña, Pepe Espaliú, Jacinto Esteva, Alex Francés, Carmela García, Miguel Ángel Gaüeca, Jean Genet, Coco Guzmán, Juan Hidalgo, William James, Jana Leo, LSD, Jesús Martínez Oliva, Marisa Maza, Pepe Miralles, Joan Morey, Nazario (Nazario Luque Vera), Ocaña, Pedro Ortuño Mengual, Alvaro Perdices, Pablo Pérez Mínguez, Guillermo Pérez Villalta, Ventura Pons, Gregorio Prieto, Rodrigo (Rodrigo Muñoz Ballester), José Romero Ahumada, Francesc Ruiz, Azucena Vieites, Virginia Villaplana Ruiz e Iván Zulueta.

Cabello/Carceller (Helena Cabello y Ana Carceller), Costus (Juan Carrero y Enrique Naya), Dias & Riedweg (Mauricio de Mello Dias y Walter Stephan Riedweg), Els 5 QK’s, Equipo Palomar (Mariokissme y R. Marcos Mota), Jeleton (María Angeles Alcántara y Jesús Arpal), Majo Post-Op, O.R.G.I.A (Beatriz Higón, Carmen Muriana y Tatiana Sentamans), Subtramas  (Virginia Villaplana Ruiz, Diego del Pozo, Montse Romaní), Toy Tool Films, Video-Nou.

Comisariado: Juan Guardiola y Juan Antonio Suárez

Detalles completos en CentroCentro

Imagen: José Romero Ahumada. Abajo la ley de peligrosidad social. 1977. Cortesía de autor@, Barcelona.

*

[English]

A review of the LGBTQ audiovisual culture in Spain since the first demonstration in defense of the rights of gays and lesbians in September 1977 in Barcelona, ??a milestone that marks the beginning of the sexual militancy in our country, until the present.

Our desire is a revolution shows how various artistic practices and discursive gay, lesbian and queer have combined the languages of the artistic avant-garde and the iconography and ways of doing the subcultures of the street to politicize the representation of the body and sexuality, to question the functioning of the public and private spheres and to re-read the hegemonic history that makes the marginal subjects invisible.

The experimental and openly political vocation of the queer image has been relatively relegated in recent decades, following the peak years of the AIDS crisis, due to the assimilation of gay-lesbian-queer sexuality to a market niche and the rise of demands more oriented to the management of the private sphere (the right to same-sex marriage) than to the collective transformation of society desired by much of the activism of the 1970s and of the later queer movement.

Faced with these strategies of normalization, this exhibition recalls the tradition of formal experimentation linked to sexual dissidence in art, an experimentation motivated by the awareness that in order to account for an unprecedented sexual and social revolution, still in To reinvent the ways of creating and narrating, articulating images and using artistic means.

Artists and collectives present in the exhibition: Carlos Aires, Florencia Aliberti, Pedro Almodóvar y Fabio McNamara, Alexander Apóstol, Manu Arregui, Cecilia Barriga, Biel Capllonch, Tino Casal, Gabriel Casas, Eduardo Chicharro, Javier Codesal, Joan Colom, Fito Conesa, Xavier-Daniel, Diego del Pozo, Luis María Delgado, David Domingo, Lucía Egaña, Pepe Espaliú, Jacinto Esteva, Alex Francés, Carmela García, Miguel Ángel Gaüeca, Jean Genet, Coco Guzmán, Juan Hidalgo, William James, Jana Leo, LSD, Jesús Martínez Oliva, Marisa Maza, Pepe Miralles, Joan Morey, Nazario (Nazario Luque Vera), Ocaña, Pedro Ortuño Mengual, Alvaro Perdices, Pablo Pérez Mínguez, Guillermo Pérez Villalta, Ventura Pons, Gregorio Prieto, Rodrigo (Rodrigo Muñoz Ballester), José Romero Ahumada, Francesc Ruiz, Azucena Vieites, Virginia Villaplana Ruiz and Iván Zulueta.

Cabello/Carceller (Helena Cabello y Ana Carceller), Costus (Juan Carrero y Enrique Naya), Dias & Riedweg (Mauricio de Mello Dias y Walter Stephan Riedweg), Els 5 QK’s, Equipo Palomar (Mariokissme y R. Marcos Mota), Jeleton (María Angeles Alcántara y Jesús Arpal), Majo Post-Op, O.R.G.I.A (Beatriz Higón, Carmen Muriana y Tatiana Sentamans), Subtramas (Virginia Villaplana Ruiz, Diego del Pozo, Montse Romaní), Toy Tool Films, Video-Nou.

Commissariat: Juan Guardiola and Juan Suárez

Complete information at CentroCentro (in Spanish)

Image: José Romero Ahumada. Under the law of social danger. 1977. Courtesy of author @, Barcelona.

How to do the History of sex – keynote speakers

Here are short abstracts for the two keynotes at our workshop, by Maria Pramaggiore and Lazlo Pearlman.

Below are short abstracts and biographies for the two keynote speakers for How to do the History of Sex, 26 May 2017 at the Edinburgh College of Art

 

Histories of Sex in Urban Ireland: Dublin’s Hirschfeld Centre
Professor Maria Pramaggiore (Maynooth University, Ireland)

Using as a case study the Hirschfeld Centre (1979-1988), one of the first openly queer spaces in Dublin and a site of LGBTQ+ activism arounds the AIDS epidemic, Maria’s paper will examine the political economy of urban spaces and the non-linear temporalities that inform queer community histories.

Professor Maria Pramaggiore is Professor and Head of Media Studies at Maynooth University. She has published widely on gender and sexuality in cinema and media. She is the author of three monographs, a co-authored film studies textbook, and a co-edited collection on bisexual culture.

 

What You See is What You Get: Visuality and Trans Performance
Lazlo Pearlman (University of Northumbria)

Since the late 1970s, autobiographical performance has been an important form in which LGBTQ and other ‘Othered’ identities can become ‘visible’, share our stories and bring awareness to issues affecting our lives. These performances have also always run the risk of essentializing identities and entrenching narratives – thereby losing potency – particularly in our 21st century neoliberal identity culture. My research asks “what can the Trans bodily identity do onstage when it does not talk about the Trans condition” and I take my jumping off point from Sandy Stone in ‘The Empire Strikes Back: A Posttranssexual Manifesto’ (1991) when she suggests constituting Trans “[…] as a genre—a set of embodied texts whose potential for productive disruption of structured sexualities and spectra of desire has yet to be explored.” To this end I posit and explore the differences between ‘visible’ identity-based performances and what I establish as my own ‘visual’ (naked) Trans identity-based performance.

I explore here the idea that narrative ‘visibility’ in performance places the emphasis on the optical and the ‘viewed’ (the subject), and examine the foreclosure of possibility that I contend this can create. I will contrast this with the way performance that works with an idea of identity ‘visuality’ could redirect the emphasis onto the viewer and the haptic, and, in refusing to allow narrative to entrench, may incite Stone’s ‘productive disruption’. I will contextualize these ideas and findings via sections of my current Practice Research performance ‘Trans-O-Graphia/Dance Me to the End of Love’.

Lazlo Pearlman is a performance maker and theorist whose areas of interest and expertise are gender, performance and cultural-studies, queer theory, transgender studies, intersectional feminism and critical race theory. He is a Lecturer at the University of Northumbria and has published and presented his work widely.

Image: Lazlo Pearlman by Jeri Poll, from www.lazlopearlman.com

 

A Golden Age for Queer Sexual Politics? Lesbian and Gay Literature and Film in 1970s Germany – Programme

Thursday 20 – Saturday 22 July 2017
Humboldt University, Berlin

This conference aims to explore the queer appeal of the 1970s by both highlighting their legendary aspects and questioning the historical construction of the decade.

International Conference
Thursday 20 July – Saturday 22 July 2017

Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaftliche Fakultät
Institute for German Literature
Research Center for the Cultural History of Sexuality

Conception and Organization: Janin Afken, Andreas Kraß, Benedikt Wolf

Click here to view the complete programme

 

Historical accounts of the German 1970s lesbian and gay movement(s) often draw the picture of a legendary decade, a golden age for queer sexual politics and culture. This view is dependent not only on the historic facts themselves, but also – and significantly – on the way in which they are narrated in literature and film, both of the 1970s themselves and of our times. However, what exactly made the 1970s a “legendary decade”? What was its revolutionary potential and what were its path-breaking political and aesthetic strategies? Which elements, movements and memories had to be marginalized in order to facilitate the historical construction of the “legendary decade”?

This conference aims to explore the queer appeal of the 1970s by both highlighting their legendary aspects and questioning the historical construction of the legendary decade. The conference focuses on the representation and construction of the queer 1970s in literature and film and highlights the process of cultural canonization and the differences between male and female homosexual expression.

 

Thursday, 20 July 2017, Kino Arsenal, Potsdamer Straße 2

6.30 pm: Welcoming Speeches by Ulrike Vedder, Andreas Kraß, Glyn Davis

7 pm: Madame X – Eine absolute Herrscherin Madame X.  Film screening (German original with English subtitles) with an introduction by the director Ulrike Ottinger

 

Friday, 21 July 2017, Festsaal der Humboldt Graduate School, Luisenstraße 56

9:30 am: Introduction by Benedikt Wolf

9:50 am: “We were so turned on”. Reflections on Queer(ing) Past and Memory. Keynote by Susanne Hochreiter (Vienna). Chair: Tomasz Basiuk (Warsaw)

10:50 am: Coffee break

11:10 am: Session 1: The Canonized Queer 1970s, Chair: N.N.

  • Janin Afken (Berlin): From Sisters’ Skin to Womb Ego. Solidarity and Corporeality in Verena Stefan’s Shedding (1975)
  • Patsy l’Amour laLove (Berlin): A Legend of Gay Emancipation: Rosa von Praunheim’s Movie “Nicht der Homosexuelle ist pervers, sondern die Situation, in der er lebt” (1971)
  • Benedikt Wolf (Berlin): Hubert Fichte’s Language of Desire. From “the Unchaste” to “Oymeln” in the Hamburg novels

12:40 pm: Lunch break

2 pm: Queers Give Me Pause. Keynote by Marc Siegel (Frankfurt a.M./Berlin). Chair: Juan Suárez (Murcia).

3 pm: Coffee break

3:20 pm: Session 2: Contesting the Canon, Chair: Hannes Hacke (Berlin)

  • Chris Auld (Ormskirk): Camp Subversion in the Films of R.W. Fassbinder
  • Vojin Saša Vukadinovic (Zurich): Aesthetics, Critique, Satire. Die Schwarze Botin and the Promise of Revolution
  • Peter Rehberg (Berlin): Bärtige Männer nackt auf Matratzenlager“: Post and Pre-Aids Representations of Gay Masculinity

4:50 pm: Coffee break

5:10 pm: Session 3: Retrospections, Chair: Patsy l’Amour laLove (Berlin)

  • Maria Bühner (Leipzig): How to Remember Invisibility: Documentary Projects on Lesbians in the German Democratic Republic as Archives of Feelings
  • Sebastian Zilles (Siegen): The 1970s in Retrospective. HIV/AIDS-Discourses in German Literature

 

Saturday, 22 July 2017, Festsaal der Humboldt Graduate School, Luisenstraße 56

9:30 am: Session 4: European Perspectives, Chair: Todd Sekuler (Berlin)

  • Alejandro Melero (Madrid): LGTB Representation and Film Censorship in German-Spanish Co-Productions During the Last Years of Franco’s Dictatorship (1970-1975)
  • Krzysztof Zablocki (Warsaw): Wolfgang Jöhling – a Builder of Bridges Between German and Polish LGBT Scenes
  • Juan A. Suárez (Murcia): The Operatic Tableau in Seventies Queer Cinema: Werner Schroeter, Adolpho Arrieta, Teo Hernández

11 am: Coffee break

11:30 am: Panel Discussion: Is There a Shared History of Lesbian Women and Gay Men in the 1970s? Antke Engel (Berlin), Michael Bochow (Berlin), Laura Guy (Edinburgh), NN., NN.; Chair: Fiona Anderson (Newcastle)

 

The conference is free to attend.

Contact and Registration until 7 July 2017: kulturgeschichte-sexualitaet@hu-berlin.de

 

Venues
Kino Arsenal, Potsdamer Straße 2, 10785 Berlin
Festsaal der Humboldt Graduate School, Luisenstraße 56, 10117 Berlin
Both of the venues are wheelchair accessible.

Conference Language is English

Image – still from Madame X.

Life Writing of Lesbian and Gay Male Authors in 1970s Germany

CRUSEV’s Janin Afken and Benedikt Wolf’s seminar ask how queer life writing is connected to significant literary tendencies in the Germans 1960s and 1970s like documentary literature and New Subjectivity.

During the summer semester of 2017, we are teaching a seminar on “Life Writing of Lesbian and Gay Male Authors in 1970s Germany” at Humboldt University of Berlin. The seminar is open for undergraduates in German Literature, European Literatures and Gender Studies. The objective of our seminar is to examine the specific constructions of queer subjectivity that are shaped by the autobiographical view in the context of gender and sexuality. The seminar asks how queer life writing is connected to significant literary tendencies in the Germans 1960s and 1970s like documentary literature and New Subjectivity. We are especially interested in problematizing the claim of authenticity as stated in many of the texts and its relationship to the binary of closet and disclosure lying at the core of the concept of coming out. In a historical perspective the question is raised, how the issue of possible confession reacts to canonical texts of autobiographical writing such as Augustinus’s Confessiones and Rousseau’s Confessions.

By reading classical theoretical texts on authorship and autobiography by Michel Foucault, Philippe Lejeune and Paul de Man, we aim to problematize the position of the author and try to grasp the specific relationship to extra-textual reality life writing often claims.

The literary texts we will read range from documentary literature like Maxie Wander’s Guten Morgen, du Schöne (1978), over confession-like personal accounts like Judith Offenbach’s (pseudonym of Luise F. Pusch) Sonja (1981) to highly stylized and canonized autofictions like Hubert Fichte’s Versuch über die Pubertät (1974). We will read seemingly anachronistic accounts like Kurt Hiller’s Leben gegen die Zeit (1978), as well as key texts of 1970s movements like Verena Stefan’s Häutungen (1975).

The examination of life writing of the 1970s allows for an illustrative and complex way of cruising the 1970s with a focus on subjectivities and their transformation in and by literature.

The seminar is organised by CRUSEV’s Janin Afken and Benedikt Wolf.

Four Films by Jim Hubbard at the Cinema Museum, London

Shortly after World AIDS Day 2017, CRUSEV’s Fiona Anderson and EUROPACH hosted a screening and discussion with Hubbard about his life and work.

The American filmmaker Jim Hubbard has been making experimental films that explore lesbian and gay activism and community building since the mid-1970s. Today, Hubbard is perhaps best known for his work as an AIDS activist and historian of AIDS activism. In 2012, he directed and co-produced the documentary United in Anger: A History of ACT UP, a powerful account of the emergence of AIDS activism in New York in the mid-to-late 1980s from the perspective of members of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, with the activist and writer Sarah Schulman. Hubbard and Schulman also coordinate the ACT UP Oral History Project, a collection of interviews with surviving members of the group.

On 9th December 2016 – shortly after World AIDS Day 2017 – CRUSEV’s Fiona Anderson and members of the fellow HERA-funded project EUROPACH (Disentangling European HIV/AIDS Policies: Activism, Citizenship and Health) hosted a screening and discussion with Hubbard about his life and work at the Cinema Museum in London. For the screening, Hubbard selected four films which span the breadth of his practice, from poetic reflections on personal loss to documentary interviews, and dealt with themes of loss, memory, activism and empowerment.

In the late 1970s, Hubbard recorded protests against the filming of William Friedkin’s controversial movie Cruising in New York’s West Village on Super 8 film, using the material in a short work that he titled Stop the Movie Cruising (1980). Hubbard’s film switches between footage of street protests in the West Village, aiming to disrupt the filming of Cruising, and voyeuristic recordings of extras on the set, chatting, laughing, and dancing inside the leather bars by the waterfront like the Ramrod and the Eagle’s Nest in which Friedkin filmed. Filming the action from outside the bar, peering in, Hubbard utilised the vantage point of cruising in this work. Moving between the club and the street, between inside and outside, setting up clear parallels between the multiple queer bodies congregating, fictionally, in the bars and the crowds of queer activists rallying against the film in the streets of the Village.

Two Marches (1991), shot on 16mm film, juxtaposes scenes recorded at two national marches on Washington D.C.: the first and second National Marches on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights in 1979 and 1987. Hubbard’s combination of footage, presented mostly in silence, makes clear the devastating and unanticipated changes that impacted queer communities in the US between the late 1970s and the late 1980s. Hubbard’s earlier film Elegy in the Streets (1989), also shot in 16mm, takes a similar approach, bringing together intimate footage of Hubbard’s former partner, the filmmaker Roger Jacoby, who died in 1985, and documentations of public demonstrations by ACT UP and the public unfurling of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt in 1987.

The event concluded with an excerpt from the documentary film Speak for Yourself (1990), in which the AIDS activists and ACT UP members Sarah Schulman and Maxine Wolfe shared their thoughts on the challenges facing activists as they seek to establish solidarity between the diverse communities affected by AIDS. This rarely screened footage provided a fascinating counterpoint to Hubbard and Schulman’s work with the ACT UP Oral History Project and the interviews which appear in Hubbard and Schulman’s film United in Anger: A History of ACT UP.

In a generous discussion with the audience after the screening, Hubbard shared his thoughts on new challenges facing LGBTQ activists in the present and the relationship between recent activism for marriage equality and the historic examples of AIDS activism documented in his film work. He also spoke about the distinctions between his recent work as a documentary filmmaker and his longstanding investment in experimental filmmaking and his desire to make non-narrative films which explore the emotional and visual experience of personal connection, loss, social exclusion, and activist world making in the time of AIDS and earlier. This collaborative event provided the CRUSEV and EUROPACH teams with an opportunity to cruise the queer visual cultures of the 1970s through Hubbard’s films, and trace the experience of activism, citizenship, and health from the 1970s to the present.

Photograph of attendees sat around small tables at the Cinema Museum. The tables are adorned with flowers and chequered green and white table cloth. To the left of the image is the bar, where two men with hats and beards stand, facing opposite directions.

Text and Photographs by Fiona Anderson.

How to do the History of Sex

Friday 26 May 2017, Edinburgh College of Art

A one-day interdisciplinary workshop on methodological approaches to the study of sex, between scholars from disciplines including sexology, medicine, law, cultural history, art and design.

One day workshop
Friday 26 May 2017
10:00 – 17:30hrs
Free

Taking place at:
Hunter Lecture Theatre
Edinburgh College of Art
74 Lauriston Place
Edinburgh
EH3 9DF

‘How to do the History of Sex’ is a free one-day interdisciplinary workshop open to all. The event’s main objective is to share methodological approaches to the study of sex between scholars working in varied disciplines, including sexology, medicine, law, cultural history, performance studies, art and design. This will be done through keynote presentations, short talks, and hands-on break-out sessions involving exploring archival materials. The aim of the workshop is for all participants to gain a wider understanding of the complexities of exploring the history of sexual behaviours and practices, and an enhanced interdisciplinary knowledge of ways to approach the subject area.

Whilst sexual behaviours and practices have served as a topic of academic study for a considerable amount of time, recent years have seen the publication of a number of high-profile theoretical texts on the topic. These include ‘Sex, or the Unbearable’ (Berlant and Edelman, 2013), ‘After Sex’ (edited by Halley and Parker, 2011) ‘Unlimited Intimacy’ (Dean, 2009) and ‘Celibacies’ (Kahan, 2013). While all outstanding contributions to the study of sexuality and sexual practices, these books rarely investigate historical materials in depth. The question that this workshop asks is: how is it possible to recover and theoretically scrutinise something as ephemeral as past instances of sexual behaviour?

Keynote speakers for the event are Lazlo Pearlman (University of Northumbria) and Professor Maria Pramaggiore (Maynooth University, Ireland).

Speakers for the event will include: Professor Sharon Cowan (Law, University of Edinburgh); Dr Laura Guy (School of Design, ECA, University of Edinburgh); Dr Agnieszka Koscianska (University of Warsaw); Neslihan Tepehan (PhD student, School of Design, ECA, University of Edinburgh); and Dr Ingrid Young (Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh).

To book a ticket, please click here.

Places on the workshop will be strictly limited to 50. Participants will need to attend the whole day, in order to contribute fully to the event. Tickets are available now!

Access: The Hunter Lecture Theatre is wheelchair accessible, and has level access from College Court Yard. Please click here for detailed information regarding wheelchair access and a map to the venue. If you have any additional access requirements, or would like to contact us regarding the event, please email crusev@ed.ac.uk

Image: from À Fleurer, by Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay.

Accessibility for Between the Sheets

Information on the accessibility of our symposium, taking place in Glasgow, 23-24 February 2017

Information on Accessibility for our symposium, Between the Sheets: Radical Print Cultures before the queer bookshop.

Thursday 23th and Friday 24th February 2017
Centre for Contemporary Art, Glasgow

The symposium will be conducted in English.

Live subtitling (speech to text transcription) will accompany both days of the symposium.

On the Thursday, pre-prepared material will be accompanied by closed caption subtitles or a transcript.

 

Access information regarding the venue

The CCA is wheelchair accessible, with level access throughout each of the floors in the building. The building comprises three floors and is situated on the corner of Sauchiehall Street and Scott Street. The ground floor includes a foyer with a box office, Duty Managers’ office, two shops, a cafe bar, gallery, cinema, accessible toilets and lift access to the first and second floors. The first floor has the theatre, Creative Lab, accessible toilets and Terrace Bar. The second floor has Intermedia Gallery and the Clubroom meeting space.

Thursday’s event will be held in the Creative Lab. Friday’s event will be held in the Club Room, with drinks afterwards taking place in the Terrace Bar.

Please note that there is no hearing loop in the Club Room.

Detailed access information for the CCA be found online here at the CCA’s website. A map of the CCA can viewed here. For a detailed statement that includes information regarding travelling to the venue, click here.

The CCA aim’s to make its building as accessible as possible. If you feel that you might need some additional help, please get in touch or ask a member of staff on arrival.

If you have any specific access requirements that the Cruising the 70s team can help you with, let us know. You can email us at crusev@ed.ac.uk

 

We will circulate accessibility information including maps of the venue and fixtures and fittings of the spaces we’ll be using and toilets, with general information about the symposium. We will not be providing BSL interpretation at the event.

Cruising the 70s welcomes any suggestions or improvements to access for our events. Feel free to speak to us at the event, or contact us via email at crusev@ed.ac.uk with any suggestions. We will be discussing provisions to improve the accessibility of our events across the duration of the project and in the run up to our conference in Edinburgh in July 2019.

Programme for Between the Sheets: Radical print cultures before the queer bookshop

Here’s the full programme for our forthcoming symposium in Glasgow, Scotland. Tickets have now sold out but those without a space can join a waiting list by calling CCA Glasgow.

Here’s the full programme for our forthcoming symposium in Glasgow, Scotland. Tickets have now sold out but those without a space can join a waiting list by calling CCA Glasgow. Accessibility information to follow shortly.

 

Between the Sheets: Radical print cultures before the queer bookshop, 23-24 February 2017 CCA Glasgow

***

Thursday 23 February, 18.00-20.00, Creative Lab
Bob Orr and Sigrid Nielsen in conversation with James Ley

***

Friday 24 February 2017, 11am-17.30, Club Room

11.00 Introduction: Fiona Anderson and Laura Guy
11.30-13.00 Roz Kaveney in conversation with Nat Raha
13.00-14.00 Lunch (not provided)
14.00-15.30 Evan Ifekoya in conversation with Nazmia Jamal
15.30-16.30 Break and ‘À Propos Unmarked, Brown Paper Packaging:
A book-wrapping action’ by Mark Clintberg & Benny Nemerofsky Ramsay (with refreshments provided)
16.45-17.30 Discussion

Symposium participants are then invited to join us in the upstairs bar

(Image: Lavender Menace bookshop courtesy of Bob Orr)

Between the Sheets: Radical print cultures before the queer bookshop

Centre for Contemporary Art, Glasgow, Scotland
23-24 February 2017

Between the Sheets is framed around three conversations with a range of speakers who will share their experiences with print cultures in the 1970s,

CCA, Glasgow 23.-24.2.2017

Book online

The 1970s was a crucial time for feminist and LGBTQ activism and community-building. Between the Sheets explores how and why reading and writing acquired such prominence and power in queer communities in Britain in this important decade, engaging with the pleasure and politics of print before the establishment of important queer bookshops like Lavender Menace and Gay’s the Word in the late 1970s and early 1980s. With contributions from artists, activists, writers, and academics, it will stop to consider tactile encounters with the printed word, reflect on collective interactions with print in reading groups and consciousness-raising sessions, and think about the development of spaces for sharing and selling books, magazines, and pamphlets in the 1970s, from women’s centres to nightclubs.

Between the Sheets is framed around three conversations with a range of speakers who will share their experiences with print cultures in the 1970s, focusing on the politics of print, on spaces of distribution and connection, and on how these often ephemeral queer print cultures have been archived and are remembered in the present. These discussions will be punctuated by performances and screenings. Looking at reading and sharing the written word as a call to action, Between the Sheets asks what the role of print was for queer communities in the 1970s and what the significance of these radical queer print cultures is for LGBTQ activists today.

 (Image: Lavender Menace bookshop courtesy of Bob Orr)

A Golden Age for Queer Sexual Politics? Lesbian and Gay Literature and Film in 1970s Germany

Friday 21 – Saturday 22 July 2017
Humboldt University, Berlin

Call for Papers

Friday 21 – Saturday 22 July 2017
Humboldt University, Berlin

Call for Papers

The German Gay Liberation Movement began with a work of art. Rosa von Praunheim’s film It Is Not the Homosexual Who Is Perverse, But the Society in Which He Lives (1971) was the trigger for the formation of homosexual emancipation groups all over West Germany. With its fierce critique of the approaches to assimilation of the 1960s homophile movement and with its revolutionary impetus, the film marked itself as a threshold towards a new time of liberation.

From the very start of the movement, women took part in the various emancipation groups. Nonetheless, gay men were dominating these groups. Since the early 1970s, homosexual women also formed up all-female lesbian groups, inspired by the women’s movement’s critique of the patriarchy. Verena Stefan’s book Häutungen (Shedding, 1975) played a substantial role in the process of shaping a political lesbian identity and eventually turned into a cult text of both the feminist and the lesbian movement.

Historical accounts of gay liberation movements have often been presented in the form of a saga, as Scott Bravmann has pointed out in his 1997 book Queer Fictions of the Past. This certainly applies for the 1970s in Germany: the period between 1971 (Praunheim’s film) and 1982 (when the term AIDS was coined) has regularly been constructed as a Golden Age of German queer history. This view is dependent not only on the historic facts themselves, but also – and significantly – on the way in which they are narrated in works of art, both of the 1970s themselves and of our times. Individual memory and historical construction are fundamentally structured by narration – and literature and film do not only participate in this process of shaping an intelligible past, but are also spaces of reflection on this process.

In the last few years interest in the more recent past of LGBTI movements has increased in the humanities. In particular, the period that is characterized deeply by the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the politics of activist groups such as ACT UP! and Queer Nation in the US context has been reread in the frame of concepts of trauma, loss and temporality. The German context did not see mass movements against the social, political and ideological consequences of HIV/AIDS like in the USA. The media reactions to AIDS nonetheless brought about a homophobic climate of repression and hatred, and German queers found effective strategies for self-aid. It seems that LGBTI activists as well as academics have only started the work of mourning the deaths of the AIDS epidemic in the past few years.

Against the backdrop of this rather dark and negative decade, its predecessor, the 1970s, begins to appear as a heyday of Gay Liberation, radical politics and sexual freedom. In Germany, the 1970s are often seen as a “legendary decade”, as the editors of  a collection of essays about the so-called Rosa Radikale (‘Pink Radicals’) write – being aware of the historical construction this understanding is based on [1]. The years after the students’ revolt of 1968 were a departure for queers both in the FRG and in the GDR. Sodomy laws were liberalized in both German states in 1968 (GDR) and 1969 (FRG). Important homosexual emancipation groups such as Homosexuelle Aktion Westberlin (Homosexual Action West Berlin, FRG) and Homosexuelle Initiative Berlin (Homosexual Initiative Berlin, GDR) were founded in 1971 and 1973 respectively. When the catastrophe of the epidemic hit the movement in the early 1980s, it was desperately estranged and almost incapable of united action.

However, what exactly made the 1970s a “legendary decade”? What was its revolutionary potential and its path-breaking political and aesthetic strategies? Which elements, movements and memories had to be marginalized in order to facilitate the historical construction of the “legendary decade”? Have the 1970s been narrated differently by the heterogeneous groups involved in LGBTI movements – especially by lesbian women in contrast to gay men? Why has the lesbian movement often been made invisible in academic discussions about both the Women’s movement and the homosexual movement [2]? Can the movement of the 1970s Pink Radicals not only be seen as an unreachable and irretrievable past, lost forever because of the AIDS crisis, but also as a foundation and inspiration for the AIDS movement of the 1980s?

In recent years some artists, film makers and writers have created works of art reflecting the queer 1970s in complex ways. In her 2014 novel Sisterhood, Claudia Koppert turns toward the early years of feminist and lesbian activism by staging the generational conflict between the protagonist and her adolescent daughter. By focusing both on the mother’s and the daughter’s perspectives, the novel creates a highly intricate reading of the ‘legendary’ feminist and lesbian past. Yoni Leyser’s film Desire Will Set You Free (2015), tells the story of a migrant to Berlin who discovers her trans identity. Both the plot of the film and some of its scenes are reminiscent of Praunheim’s 1971 film, and Praunheim finally appears in the film along with other ‘heroes’ of the 1970s such as Blixa Bargeld and Nina Hagen. The queer 1970s seem to exercise quite a strong appeal for contemporary reflections of queer culture.

The conference aims to explore the queer appeal of the 1970s by both highlighting the legendary aspects of the 1970s and questioning the historical construction. It also seeks to unearth marginalized, erased or ephemeral cultural expressions of the time and to investigate to what degree women, marginalized masculinities (proletarian and migrant) and the reality of the GDR have been excluded from historical narratives. The conference will focus on the representation and construction of the queer 1970s in literature and film and highlight the process of cultural canonization, the differences between male and female homosexual expression, the characteristics of trans* and racialized experiences, and the queer culture of East Germany.

We invite papers that focus on literature and films of the 1970s as well as papers that investigate contemporary cultural expressions that reflect the 1970s. Papers may scrutinize either individual authors and film-makers or thematic aspects in various works of art. We invite papers on ‘serious’ as well as experimental, avant-garde, underground, trivial and pornographic texts or films. Papers that analyze German culture in a broader European context are especially welcome.

Possible contexts and topics include:

  • lesbian and gay literature
  • lesbian and gay film
  • heteronormative works referring to LGBTI issues
  • works referring to trans issues
  • works referring to issues of race
  • Punk and Glam Rock
  • Drag Culture (Tunten)
  • Pornography

The conference will take place from July 21-22 2017 at Humboldt University of Berlin.

The conference language is English.

For individual proposals, please submit a one-page, double-spaced abstract in English with a short biographical note before 31 December 2016 via kulturgeschichte-sexualitaet@hu-berlin.de.

The accepted papers will be published as a collection of essays after the conference.

Unfortunately, we are not able to fund travel or accommodation costs.

The Conference is organized as part of the HERA-funded research project “Cruising the 1970s: Unearthing Pre-HIV/AIDS queer sexual cultures” by the Research Center “Cultural History of Sexuality” (Institute for German Literature, Humboldt University of Berlin).

Janin Afken, Andreas Krass, Benedikt Wolf
Forschungsstelle Kulturgeschichte der Sexualität
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Institut für deutsche Literatur
Unter den Linden 6
10099 Berlin
References

[1] Andreas Pretzel/ Volker Weiß: Die westdeutsche Schwulenbewegung der 1970er Jahre. Annäherungen an ein legendäres Jahrzehnt, in: Pretzel/ Weiß (eds.): Rosa Radikale. Die Schwulenbewegung der 1970er Jahre, Geschichte der Homosexuellen in Deutschland nach 1945, Vol 2, Hamburg 2012, p. 9–26.

[2] Gabriele Dennert/ Christiane Leidinger/ Franziska Rauchut: Lesben in Wut. Lesbenbewegung in der BRD der 70er Jahre, in: Dennert/ Leidinger/ Rauchut (eds.): In Bewegung bleiben. 100 Jahre Politik, Kultur und Geschichte von Lesben, Berlin 2007, p. 31–61.